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Your doctor is your best resource for answers to questions about symptoms and treatment for heartburn, acid reflux, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and erosive esophagitis due to acid-mediated GERD. However, this quick reference guide can help you find answers to some common questions.

If you have additional questions about your GERD symptoms and treatment, and PRILOSEC® Packets, talk to your doctor.

How do I get a PRILOSEC® Packets Savings Card?

Download the Prilosec® Packets Savings Card and bring the Savings Card to the pharmacy when you fill your prescription for PRILOSEC® Packets. Your prescriptions could be as little as $9 per month, if you are eligible.*

You can also continue to use your Savings Card each time you refill your prescription, up to 12 times in a calendar year.

*Subject to eligibility rules; restrictions apply. Not valid for prescriptions that are eligible to be reimbursed, in whole or in part, by Medicaid, Medicare (including Medicare Part D and Medicare Advantage), TriCare, CHAMPUS, or any other local, state or federal healthcare programs, including state prescription drug assistance programs and the La Reforma de Salud program in Puerto Rico. Subject to eligibility rules; restrictions apply.

What is EE?

Erosive esophagitis, or EE, is the medical name for a condition in which parts of the esophagus (the hollow tube (esophagus) that connects the mouth to) are inflamed and worn away. EE is most commonly caused by chronic acid reflux, which you may also know as "chronic heartburn," "acid reflux," "acid indigestion," or "gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)." Heartburn happens when the contents of the stomach come up the tube (esophagus) that connects your mouth to your stomach, and the acid from the stomach touches the lining of the esophagus, which can become irritated and wear away (erode).

EE can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider, and your healthcare provider is your best resource for information about EE, its symptoms, and treatment. If you have any questions about EE or any other health matter, speak with your healthcare provider.

References:

Badillo R, Francis D. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. World J Gastrointest Pharmacol Ther. 2014;5(3):105-112.

Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108:308-328. Corrigendum: Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108:1672.

Lynch KD. Erosive esophagitis. In: Merck Manual: Consumer Version. Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/digestive-disorders/esophageal-and-swallowing-disorders/erosive-esophagitis. Accessed September 26, 2017.

Definition & Facts for GER & GERD in Children & Teens. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-children-teens/definition-facts. Accessed July 10, 2017.

Diseases and Conditions: Heartburn. Mayo Clinic Staff. Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heartburn/basics/definition/con-20019545. Accessed July 10, 2017.

What is GERD?

GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease, is the medical name for a more serious and long-lasting condition of frequent heartburn, acid indigestion, or acid reflux, with the symptoms happening more than twice a week for weeks. GERD can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. GERD is more common in adults than children, but up to 25% of children and teens have GERD symptoms. More than half of 4-month-old babies have GERD symptoms, but GERD seems to lessen as babies get older because by age 1 year, only about 10% of babies have GERD symptoms. In infants, the most common symptom of GERD is spitting up more than they normally do, but can also include symptoms like colic, vomiting, and refusing to eat.

Without treatment, and over time, GERD can sometimes lead to other health complications like respiratory problems (including asthma, congestion, hoarseness, laryngitis, and pneumonia), esophageal stricture (a narrowing of the esophagus), and damage to tooth enamel.

If you or a loved one experience painful heartburn more than twice a week, or over-the-counter antacid medications do not provide sufficient relief, make an appointment to speak with your doctor.

References:

Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Infants. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-infants. Accessed July 10, 2017.

Definition & Facts for GER & GERD in Children & Teens. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-children-teens/definition-facts. Accessed July 10, 2017.

Definition & Facts for GER & GERD in Infants. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-infants/definition-facts. Accessed July 10, 2017.

Symptoms & Causes of GER & GERD in Infants. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-infants/symptoms-causes. Accessed July 10, 2017.

Diseases and Conditions: Heartburn. Mayo Clinic Staff. Available at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heartburn/basics/definition/con-20019545. Accessed July 10, 2017.

Vandenplas Y, Rudolph CD, Di Lorenzo C, Hassall E, Liptak G, Mazur L, Sondheimer J, Staiano A, Thomson M, Veereman-Wauters G, Wenzl TG, North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux clinical practice guidelines: joint recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2009;49(4:498-547.

What are PRILOSEC® Packets?

PRILOSEC® Packets for delayed-release oral suspension are a prescription medicine called a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). PRILOSEC reduces the amount of acid in your stomach.

PRILOSEC is used in adults:

  • for up to 8 weeks for the healing of duodenal ulcers. The duodenal area is the area where food passes when it leaves the stomach.
  • with certain antibiotics for 10 to 14 days to treat an infection caused by bacteria called H. pylori. If needed, your doctor may decide to prescribe another 14 to 18 days of PRILOSEC by itself after the antibiotics. Sometimes H. pylori bacteria can cause duodenal ulcers. The infection needs to be treated to prevent the ulcers from coming back.
  • for up to 8 weeks for healing stomach ulcers.
  • for up to 4 weeks to treat heartburn and other symptoms that happen with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD happens when acid in your stomach backs up into the tube (esophagus) that connects your mouth to your stomach. This may cause a burning feeling in your chest or throat, sour taste, or burping.
  • for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE). If needed, your doctor may decide to prescribe another 4 weeks of PRILOSEC.
  • to maintain healing of the esophagus. It is not known if PRILOSEC is safe and effective when used for longer than 12 months (1 year) for this purpose.
  • for the long-term treatment of conditions where your stomach makes too much acid. This includes a rare condition called Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome.
  • Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.

For children 1 to 16 years of age, PRILOSEC is used:

  • for up to 4 weeks to treat heartburn and other symptoms that happen with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
  • for up to 8 weeks to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus [called erosive esophagitis (or EE) due to acid-mediated GERD].
  • to maintain healing of the esophagus. It is not known if PRILOSEC is safe and effective when used longer than 12 months (1 year) for this purpose.

Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.

For children 1 month to less than 12 months (1 year) of age, PRILOSEC is used:

  • for up to 6 weeks to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus [called erosive esophagitis (or EE) due to acid-mediated GERD]. It is not known if PRILOSEC is safe and effective for other uses in children 1 month to less than 12 months (1 year) of age, or in children less than 1 month of age.

Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.

Who should not take PRILOSEC® Packets?

Do not take PRILOSEC if you:

  • are allergic to omeprazole or any of the ingredients in PRILOSEC. Click below for a complete list of ingredients in PRILOSEC.
  • are allergic to any other proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicine.
  • are taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine (EDURANT, COMPLERA) used to treat HIV-1 (Human Immunodeficiency Virus).

Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.

What should I tell my doctor before taking PRILOSEC® Packets?

Before taking PRILOSEC, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have been told that you have low magnesium levels in your blood.
  • have liver problems.
  • have any other medical conditions.
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if PRILOSEC will harm your unborn baby.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. PRILOSEC passes into your breast milk. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if you take PRILOSEC.

Tell your doctor about all of the medicines you take including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. PRILOSEC may affect how other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how PRILOSEC works. Especially tell your doctor if you take an antibiotic that contains clarithromycin or amoxicillin, or if you take clopidogrel (Plavix), methotrexate (Otrxup, Rasuvo, Trexall), St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum), or rifampin (Rimactane, Rifater, Rifamate).

Know the medicines that you take. Keep a list of them to show your doctor and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.

How should I take PRILOSEC®?

PRILOSEC® Packets are a delayed-release oral suspension treatment for heartburn and other symptoms associated with GERD in children as young as 1 year of age and adults who have trouble swallowing pills.* This means that PRILOSEC® Packets mix with water for easy dosing and administration. Just mix, set, stir, and drink! It is that simple to get control for heartburn and other symptoms associated with GERD.

PRILOSEC® Packets delayed-release oral suspension is intended to be prepared in water and administered orally or via a nasogastric (NG) or gastric tube. To learn about administration, see How to Use PRILOSEC® Packets.

* PRILOSEC® Packets is indicated for the treatment of heartburn and other symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) for up to 4 weeks in patients 1 year of age and older. Please speak with your doctor about specific Indications.

What are the possible side effects of PRILOSEC®?

See What is the most important information I should know about PRILOSEC?

PRILOSEC® Packets can cause serious side effects, including:

  • Vitamin B-12 deficiency. PRILOSEC reduces the amount of acid in your stomach. Stomach acid is needed to absorb vitamin B-12 properly. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on PRILOSEC for a long time (more than 3 years).
  • Low magnesium levels in your body. This problem can be serious. Low magnesium can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine for at least 3 months. If low magnesium levels happen, it is usually after a year of treatment.

You may or may not have symptoms of low magnesium. Tell your doctor right away if you develop any of these symptoms:

  • Seizures
  • Jitteriness
  • Spasms of the hands and feet
  • Dizziness
  • Jerking movements or shaking (tremors)
  • Cramps or muscle aches
  • Abnormal or fast heart beat
  • Muscle weakness
  • Spasm of the voice box

Your doctor may check the level of magnesium in your body before you start taking PRILOSEC or during treatment if you will be taking PRILOSEC for a long period of time.

Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.

How should I store PRILOSEC®?

Keep PRILOSEC and all medicines out of the reach of children.

Store PRILOSEC for Delayed-Release Oral Suspension at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C to 25°C).

Read the Medication Guide before you start taking PRILOSEC and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor about your medical condition or your treatment.

Reference: PRILOSEC [package insert]. Zug, Switzerland: Covis Pharma; 2017.